Leaders ignoring issues that face rural hospitals E-mail
Opinion
Saturday, 30 August 2014 08:45

By Hutchinson News, Aug. 22

 

People who live in the small rural communities of Kansas rely on the critical access hospitals that serve their hometowns. Yet, keeping those hospitals afloat is a constant struggle that requires extraordinary investment from taxpayers — fewer of whom are left each year to support those hospitals.

The situation isn’t being helped by the bullheaded decision by Gov. Sam Brownback and the Kansas Legislature to reject a federal expansion of Medicaid. Health-care officials repeatedly have stressed that failure to accept the expansion will leave more people relying on emergency room service, which is the most costly health care and which often goes unpaid. Complicating the issue further is that those same hospitals also will experience a reduction in Medicare reimbursement, a measure based on the assumption that those hospitals would offset the decrease by increased coverage through Medicaid.

That reality puts the burden of financing rural hospitals squarely on the backs of the rural residents who want and need those hospitals in their communities. Throughout the state, voters have approved local bond issues and other financing to upgrade, repair and finance the operations of their small hospitals.

Yet the long-term reality is that those communities can’t support their hospitals indefinitely. With an aging population, the tax base shrinks each year. And like when a school closes in a rural community, the closing of a hospital makes it harder for those towns to attract new residents who can help support the hospital, the local school district and small businesses.

Topeka, however, seems to have little concern for the future of rural Kansas. The state’s decision-makers have flatly ignored this issue, because the reality — that they’re systematically killing western Kansas communities — doesn’t blend well with their ideologically driven campaign message. And the proven support from taxpayers to keep these hospitals afloat undermines the thin and thoughtless message that there’s no such thing as a good, or useful, tax.

Maybe, someday, concern for the real issues facing the rural parts of Kansas will supersede elected officials’ desire to retain their seats in Topeka. Then the state can begin to explore ways to make health care accessible and affordable to Kansans in the smallest towns. That can begin with the simple decision to accept an expansion of Medicaid.

Until then, the burden and the cost will remain on individual communities that already struggle to keep their towns inviting and viable in the face of constant disregard from the people who could provide some relief with a simple “yes.”

 
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The High Plains Daily Leader and Southwest Daily Times are published Sunday through Friday and reaches homes throughout the Liberal, Kansas retail trade zone. The Leader & Times is the official newspaper of Seward County, USD No. 480, USD No. 483 and the cities of Liberal and Kismet.  The Leader & Times is a member of the Liberal Chamber of Commerce, the Kansas Press Association, the National Newspaper Association and the Associated Press.

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